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The Cancer Letter Inc.
PO Box 9905
Washington
DC 20016
Tel: 202-362-1809
Fax: 202-379-1787
publication date: Jan 22, 2016
ISSUE 3 - JAN. 22, 2016 PDF



Biden's Cancer Moonshot to Focus
On Bioinformatics and Data Sharing

The Obama administration will find the money to create a comprehensive oncology bioinformatics system, Vice President Joe Biden pledged Jan. 19 at a meeting of international cancer experts at the World Economic Forum in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland.

Biden, whose son Beau died of brain cancer in May 2015 at age 46, is leading the White House “moonshot” program, which was announced by President Barack Obama during his final State of the Union address Jan. 12 (The Cancer Letter, Jan. 15).

Obama is expected to announce the details of funding the moonshot in his budget proposal Feb. 9.

  Biden: Cancer Moonshot Seeks Quantum Leaps, Not Incremental Change

The text of Vice President Joe Biden’s Jan. 19 remarks at a World Economic Forum meeting of international cancer experts in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland, follows:

Almost everyone in the world, as you all know, has a family member who’s had cancer. Every year, around the world, 14 million people are diagnosed with cancer and 8 million people succumb to it, die, from cancer.

And like many of you, I have experienced in my family the dreaded C-word that I think is the most frightening word that most people—as these docs and scientists can tell you—that anyone wants to hear walking out of a doctor’s office.

     

    Guest Editorial

    The False Allure of The Cancer Cure

    By Robert Cook-Deegan

    Over the past century, we have had many wars on cancer, and now we have a national “moonshot” to be spearheaded by Vice President Joe Biden, announced in President Barack Obama’s Jan. 12 State of the Union Address.

    In 1937, even as Congress was establishing the National Cancer Institute as the first of the National Institutes of Health, the American Committee to Combat Cancer was organizing the “Women’s Field Army” to mobilize against cancer, especially uterine, ovarian, and breast cancers. The main argument was that the nation was spending vastly more per person affected, and per death, on polio than it was on cancer. It was framed as a war.

      In Brief
      • James Willson named chief scientific officer of CPRIT

      • Mary-Claire King wins the Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

      • Mylin Torres named director of Glenn Family Breast Center at Winship
      • New York Genome Center receives $100 million grant from the Simons Foundation and Carson Family Charitable Trust

      • MD Anderson Cancer Center and AbbVie form immuno-oncology collaboration

      Drugs and Targets
      • Venetoclax receives Breakthrough Therapy Designation from FDA

      • FDA grants Priority Review to lenvatinib


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